Redhead drops his second video for my song “Talk White” featuring me and Bobby

Against my better wishes, The homie Redhead was hungry to release the follow-up visual to his lead off video from his instant classic, The Schemata. Straight from a renegade shoot that we did back on one cool day in November/December, his second video is actually the first video off part 2 of my project slated to drop later this year. The song “Talk White” is somewhat of a fabled track in the Malik-16 timeline. Produced by my P.N.C. Khalil a.k.a K.Lio – who just went thru another name change to Jim Nastic, the track laid dusty for 2 years before I took a liking to it and made this concept song that became a favorite among my brief management. My disillusioned would-be handlers thought this song was big enough to be my “P.S.A.” (not likely). But I did like it enough to keep it on the tracklisting. And the homie Bobby from my Gemstars fam loved it, so I decided to spruce it up for a remix and call up  him and Redhead to expound on the paradox of rapping with a less than threatening voice and good enunciation. Red decided to put it on his album as well and so now you can hear 2 different versions of the song. His version features an alternate verse from me and 2 different verses from him. Mine features Bobby and 2 different verses from me. Here’s the video that gives you the best of both worlds…Directed by Redhead and I and edited by Redhead for dolo.

The talent is immense…

My Turn!!

After posting a slew of other unsigned rappers’ music videos since the year opened, I guess it’s about that time that I remind you all why I feel important enough to have even started a blog in the first place.

Remember kiddies,

I’m a rapper. Quite possibly the best rapper out. But that’s a story for another date. Right now this is just a little something that me and my boy @NameisE put together to let you know that my very first original music project is indeed coming. One way or another…

They call it, a commercial

 

16 Reasons Why I’m The Greatest Rapper You Never Heard! Or 16 Reasons Why I’m Better Than The Last 3 Freshman Classes!!

16. I’m relatively handsome

We can all attest that looks don’t matter half as much as the industry would have you believe. IF they matter at all. The success of some of the biggest rappers in the last 2 decades has hinged more on their personas and characters than their sex appeal. Rappers tend to find their niche and make you like the story that they create with their image. Being a physical specimen to be gawked at only works if you’re aiming to pigeonhole yourself and attract a limited demographic. But it never hurts to be a bit easy on the eyes. If you can spit, and attract the opposite sex to the point where you can be taken seriously when you make records about relations, it always increases how far you can reach. And as subjective as this matter may be, it’s not up for debate that I’m unattractive or have any weird or distracting features. At most, I look like a regular ol’ nigga. At Best, I’m a fly dude.

15. I’m From A Cool Place

Harlem is an ambiguous territory to hail from. It’s famous, legendary and an epicenter of trends. Yet and still, it’s produced a very short list of successful rappers. It’s a 2 way street for a rapper hailing from this hometown. I won’t necessarily be putting it on the map, but with a huge gap left between Doug E. Fresh‘s era and  Mase and Diddy’s run, to the space left since Dipset held the crown, there’s room for someone to return it to glory and take it further than it’s ever been.

14. I Can Freestyle

Tho it may not hold much weight anymore, Ask anyone about how they’ve come to know me, and they’ll mention this quality. Not mixtape freestyling. No, I mean off the top of the head, stream of consciousness. It makes for good in person spontaneous entertainment and display of ability. It also shows dexterity and demonstrates quick wit and ability to think sharp. One of my most famous YouTube videos is one where I’m freestyling over Lil Wayne‘s “Prom Queen” instrumental. It’s what got me last contract.

13. I’m Self-Sufficient

I have many affiliations, yet when you see me on stage, it’s just me. No hypeman. I may invite a bunch of my musician friends each time (as pointed out by my homegirl TDJ), but it’s still a one man operation. Since 2006 I’ve been the motor behind every aspect of my career from the sequencing of my projects, to the design of my sites. I haven’t had the luxury of having some immaculate team of pros executing my ideas for me, so I hire professional individuals to get the jobs done that I can’t and I always have a collaborative hand in the planning and final product. All this means is that I don’t wait on anyone, make excuses for myself or lean on anything. Everything you see is a reflection of my creativity. Now this may be a headache for some A&R somewhere who’s still working off of the idea that artists need to be handheld and told what to do every step of the way, but for a company looking to have less overhead and expedite their profit by banking on an all-encompassing artist…There you have it…

12. I’ve Grinded

Piggy-backing off of that last point, I’ve been pursuing this long enough to know what works and what doesn’t. Both for me as a rapper and for other artists. I’ve studied this game. I’ve been a songwriter and sat in the offices with some of the heads behind some of the biggest projects. Falling and failing have given me the advantage of seeing where my appeal and approach can be strengthened, so there’s less weak spots now. I’ve hit the angles, put in the elbow grease and leg work, so I have a story to tell. It may be one of trial and error, but It’s a story nonetheless. This is no dollar and a dream.

11. I’m A Student Of The Game

I didn’t just pick up a pen and decide that I wanted to rap because it was cool to do it. I started out as a child, formed a little rap group around the time of the ABC and Kriss Kross boom and made up 10 bar raps in my head all the time. In high school, I listened to underground radio strictly for years. In college, I loved the club stuff. I’ve read the books, been a fan, been a schemer, been desperate, been jaded. But I still love the music at the end of the day. I change with the times, while staying close to the roots that got me involved and interested. All this has brought me to sense of well roundedness where I don’t lean too far to any side because I understand why each one exists and I see room for the middle. These are the elements that I’m among and which have influenced me.

10. I Have A Story

Tho it can’t be summed up in a one nuclear sentence by me. Maybe a publicist can do that. It’s undeniably there. Being from a place like Harlem and being raised in the 1980’s should already color the landscape for any listener wondering how I became the product that I am. I almost defy every stereotype there is about what is equated with my region. College educated, no drugs or alcohol, no criminal record, no fashion trends. But balance that with being a dropout, with drug dealing and using parents and a street-based belief in self preservation…Not to mention a long rap history of winning awards, honors and being the first unsigned rapper to grace the legendary booth on BET‘s RapCity. There’s plenty of story there…Just put it together.

9. I’m Not Region Specific

Some say you should have your city on your back first, but there’s millions of rappers who go elsewhere and blow before they really make it national. Again, this is another old industry standard which has been shattered. I always believe that a person should rep their area and never forget where they came from, but the point of being an artist is to reach as many people as possible. Too many rappers, and especially New York rappers, have a tendency to rap in ways that only could be relatable to people in their locality.  Because I’ve lived in Georgia and D.C. and Iam indeed a student of the game, I’ve been exposed to all kinds of sounds and patterns of speech. Most importantly, I’ve gotten to experience why certain things resonate with certain people in certain places, and what things are generally universal across the board. Without sounding contrived, this has soaked into my sound. I’m not your typical New York rapper, rapping about New York shit or using flows only New Yorkers would appreciate.

8. I’m Not Stuck In An Era, Movement or Niche Market

Yeah. I’m not trying to bring the golden era back, neither in rap nor fashion. I’d rather sound like the sum of my influences that have given birth to something new than sound like one big homage to them. I don’t want to bring back the spirit of any particular rapper and I certainly wouldn’t limit myself to having a gimmick or angle that would pigeonhole me like the whole horror-core meets hipster schtick, or the stupid weed-rap clicks, not even emo-rap. I can’t be associated with a wave. I’m not for the moment. I have no limits and no bounds. The old industry standard says that you MUST pick a route. I say that wall was broken a long time ago and that myth debunked with artists like Kanye who prove that there are rappers who can be real rappers but not be defined by one kind of subject matter or one kind of beat or guest appearance. As long as you don’t spread yourself too thin and look out of your box trying to do a little of everything like Wyclef, you can be an expansive M.C. that can’t be defined in one category. Not even Jay can be considered one kind of rap at this point.

7.  I Got a Good Voice

GURU said it in ’94. “It’s mostly the voice”. Mine sits somewhere in the best place possible. Flexible and not too light, not too deep. Once again, in the middle. Some gravelly voiced rappers sound made for hardcore anthems, but out of place on smoother records. Some whispery or buttery rappers couldn’t pull of attempts over harder beats. I don’t have either. Just a nice New York tone with southern twangs that pop up here and there. I emphasize words and here and there, and color my speech. So it’s never that flat, lifeless thing that Diddy does. But I’m also not yelling like Meek Mill or Papoose. There’s a natural melodiousness and sometimes it comes out in my cadence. As noted on my second mixtape, I’m not a singer…But I can hold a note…

6. I Actually Talk About Something

Picture that. For all of these neo movements, nobody’s really talking about anything directly. The rise of emo rap has given birth to a bunch of rappers who have no qualms about whining about themselves and their fame. The stresses of these mostly suburban cats is so immense that they have to smoke weed everyday and build superficial relationships with women. Cry me a river. On the other side of that coin, you got a bunch of other heads that think they’re talking about something because they sprinkle in some words like “Free” and “fuck the government”. I’m willing to make that the WHOLE song. AND make it just as catchy as the most ignorant song out. Remember when Dead Prez came out with “It’s Bigger Than Hip-Hop”, or “Jesus Walks” by Kanye?? Those songs were getting played at parties and clubs and no one stopped the record and said, ‘hey! you can’t play that cause it’s conscious’. Without coming off as a conscious rapper or beating listeners over the head with preachy content, I dare to be the guy who has as many songs about real life as I have about fly life. In my time I’ve rapped about everything from the color Black to the month of October to teenage pregnancy to suicide to over-drinking, to street life to comparing life to one big party. And I don’t mean making mention of it, no I mean whole songs dedicated to each topic. And I stay on topic. With swag!

5. I Got Flows

So many people still don’t quite understand this concept. Alot of this has to do with the fact that there are interchangeable words that get tossed around. This is also known as pattern or delivery.  The tricky thing is that delivery also has to do with vocal inflection. Luda‘s flows are only as good as the animation in his voice when he lands on certain words. But most importantly, these things are so important because you only notice them when a rapper gets stuck in a flow. Detractors of 2Pac’s number 1 critique of him is that he raps the same way and uses the same pattern on every song. Is that true? No. But he’s done it enough throughout his career that it can be a valid point. he’s known by it. Being known by a particular flow can make a name for a rapper, but it can also be their undoing. It can limit their appeal and make them the subject of easy ridicule. It’s been noted that Jadakiss‘ refusal to evolve his flow has stunted his own mass appeal. He always raps the same. Fab was in danger of this before he stepped it up years ago. Most New York and southern rappers have trouble with this after amassing enough regional fame. There’s a comfort level there. I don’t have a definite pattern. And while no one has really truly invented a new flow probably since the days of Bone, what we all are now are products of the greatest flows ever! If we haven’t absorbed those and implemented them into our repertoire in ways that sound refreshing, then what’s the point?? I rap slow, I rap fast. I use compounds, I use sing-song cadences. I rhymes lines inside of lines. I take big pauses sometimes. Timing is the crucial element to using flows. I never want anyone to listen to more than 3 tracks of mine and say I rap the same way for a whole project.  I don’t even keep one pattern all the way thru one song. And I don’t want to make slight changes where it’s not noticeable, nor do I want to make dramatic changes where it sounds like I’m doing too much and going out of my range. You may not realize it til after you think about it, but you appreciate that fact about me. I made a whole track about using other people’s flows. Just to show that I understand why It’s important. It’s  over 7 minutes long, and the only reason why people listen until the end, is because the switch in flows keeps their attention.

4. I Know How To Make Songs

Which brings me to this point. What good is being the nicest rapper with all these wordy and ridiculous bars if you can’t condense them into a song format that  makes people want to listen?!  Any true fan of yours is going to try to vouch for you. But not enough people will reinforce that sentiment if you just don’t have the knack or make the music to show and prove. I use Saigon as an example of this once again. People love him. But not enough. Just Blaze is considered one of the best producers ever. You have him at your disposal and STILL couldn’t deliver songs that stuck with anyone. Song construction is the biggest test that I throw at any rapper. What good are all of your mixtape freestyles or viral cyphers if you sound wack in 16 bar format? The even bigger challenge is making a song with mass appeal. Do you know what kind of beats get reactions from people? What instruments go well together and what sounds cheesy? Do you pay attention to PEOPLE enough to know what THEY like as opposed to giving them what you THINK they’ll like?? Or having your head so far up your ass that you think they’re just going to gravitate to you with your self-indulgent abstract shit?? There’s a crowd for everything. And anyone can get a group of followers and supporters who like them even to tolerate that. Even Charles Hamilton has devoted stans. But does that translate to sold out shows or longevity? probably not. I guess the question becomes, how far do you want to go in rap?? See, someone like me cares about what girls like as much as I care about what the niggas on my corner like, and any corner in the world at that, as much as I care about what my family can respond to. So I make my music with that in mind, following music theory methods which have been tried and true. Taking cues from successful songs in rap’s history. Taking cues from artists who got respect for killing mixtapes and battles as well as radio. I tell stories that are linear, I make memorable hooks, I don’t use abstract shit that can isolate a whole cluster of people.

3. I know The Difference Between Punchlines With Similes And Metaphors And Other Rhetorical Devices…And I Use Them!

I’m a product of lots of special english courses. I know what hyperbole and alliteration are. I make good use of such things and place them where they need to go. I use metaphors as metaphors. Sometimes my whole song is a metaphor. I know similies and I make sure they’re not lazy ones (i.e. “rush like Limbaugh” – wack!). Ever since I learned the importance of using punchlines as a teenager after getting demolished in a battle, I’ve built up my strength with them. A rap song doesn’t really feel good without these clever things. Wit is respected by every rap crowd, in every locale. I use it all the time. I put punchlines in my deeper songs, I put them in my songs about girls, and I kill them in my braggadocious rhymes! I use every instrument of wordplay in the arsenal. My favorite is the double entendre. The phonetic homophone-based ones can be tricky, but again, timing makes everything right. Now put that together with the fact that I use different flows and make catchy songs. It’s not an easy feat.

2. I’m Charismatic And Compelling

None of the above things that I mentioned are worth a damn if this isn’t in place. Perhaps this arises from coming from a cool place, having a story and being  student of the game, but I have character. Not a character. But character. And it comes out in my songs. Without this, my club songs would not come off as believable. My stories wouldn’t grip anyone and make them want to listen to the end to hear the climax. My boasts would seem empty. You wouldn’t take my girl songs seriously if you think I don’t get girls. Some of this is very subjective, but for the most part, My voice is not full of pain like some rappers, but there’s a charm and sincerity that comes with how I say things. I’m also honest to a fault. I don’t make any reservations about sharing my highs and lows, lamenting on my mistakes and failures, or poking fun at my shortcomings. I don’t rap about anything that someone can comeback to me and say I haven’t or wouldn’t do. Sure, there’s plenty of exaggeration in Hip-Hop, but I don’t go overboard or glorify, or lie. I’m me all day in my recordings. I can sleep comfortably knowing I gave the world my truth. The way my projects are sequenced and all of the means I’ve executed to get my point across should have you feeling like I’m a pretty cool and interesting dude afterwards. Basically, listening to my rap should make you at least somewhat intrigued to meet me in person. If you don’t care about a rapper as you listen, then they haven’t made you care from their music. Anybody can rap, it’s the soul and the passion of the person rapping that make you want to go back again and again to hear what they have to say.

1. I’m A Dope Performer

Last and certainly not least, since we’re talking about wanting to see an artist in person, A performance is one of the greatest ways to do so. it’s the final frontier for anyone who wants to do this for real. A true performer gives you a great look at their personality during a performance. You hear them talk, see their facial expressions. See their crew and supporters and how much they rely on them. As someone who’s so used to doing most things alone, and being involved in every aspect, you can be sure that I polly with the people behind the music at a show and get my arrangements right. I don’t mob the stage with my crew, I don’t stand in one place, I also don’t say corny things like “Make noise”. Yet what I do is take into account what kinds of crowds I’m performing for, I survey them, get a feel, and always try to get them involved. I make small talk with them, I joke, I get them interacting in my call and response hooks in ways that may relate to them. I walk off stage with the mic. I act out my words. I wear eye-catching stuff based on the song I’m performing. I freestyle. I ‘ve performed with bands and with djs. I’m comfortable with both. I have breath control and you can hear every word I say, even when I rap fast. And most importantly, I know how to hold the fuckin mic properly!

Hot 16…Or More…”HOMICIDE”

And now we’re here…

Past the point of breaking down songs from my first opus to another set of mixtapes that I wrote between 2005 and 2006. This particular set is a double mixtape that I released titled How To Make A Mixtape Volumes 1 & 2. Today we’ll focus on a track from Vol. 1

Originally intended to be my remake and ode to Jay-Z‘s In My Lifetime Vol. 1, this concept transformed in the year 2007 after all my initial recordings were lost to a producer who stopped communicating with me. That was the founder of my Balance crew, but that’s neither here nor there. When I began re-recording this mixtape, I decided the theme would be one that addressed the fact that so many rappers were flooding the landscape. The subtitle to this mixtape is “who doesn’t rap??!” So naturally, new tracks were added to poke fun of that. However, alot of the raps over the beats from the original concept remained – hence all of the Jay-Z instrumentals on there. One of the new tracks that I added was this one, entitled “Homicide”, from an E-40 song produced by Lil Jon that attacks and sounds super-menacing. It goes right with the theme as the 3rd song on the mixtape that follows me teaching rappers how to make a good mixtape intro, then proving that I can use popular rappers’ styles as well as them. This is the track where I’m threatening other rappers and attempting to purify the stream by flooding out the excess and bullshit guys. On a deeper note, it’s me using symbolic violence against those rappers in particular who glorify real violence and oversaturate so-called gangsta rap. I’m pointing out how ridiculous they are for promoting and embellishing that, but at the same time, I’m speaking to them in a language they’d understand. It’s my take on ethnic cleansing. A Hip-Hop genocide spearheaded by me. Better yet a straight…

HOMICIDE

“Homie I used to be scared of the 6, (a slight nod to the classic sexual Biggie intro line that Lil Kim used later. Also, an acknowledgement of the fact that I associate the number 6 with sin, superstitiously

but now I throw a 1 in front of it, (by naming myself after a figure with the number 6 in it, I’m now owning and redefining something that I thought was negative)

to show muthafuckas who they gunnin’ with! (M-16 is also a gun. ‘Gunnin’ also means to contend. Double entendre at work)

That M-16’ll bring ’em punishment,

Ask ’em who he think that he’d be fuckin with??!

It’s clear that

(HOOK)

“They dont want it, they ain’t nuthin, they just bluffin, they won’t come an make their way up to the Hundreds

– they don’t wanna riiiide!

They ain’t dumpin’, they ain’t pumpin’, they ain’t buckin’, they just frontin, saying stuff and makin’ up shit

– they don’t wanna die!!

So call your help an, call your brethren, call your friends an, call your reverends, ‘fore they have to call the medics – be in trauma right?

They one theyself in, done theyself in, run theyself into a fuckin’ one-way dead end, 187 – call it homicide!”

(Basically, the summation of what the song is about; me versus the fake gangster rap goons exaggerating  in rhyme and threatening to end their lives…In rap that is)

VERSE 1

“Nigga if you anything about me!

Then you’d know better than to doubt me…

You’d be well aware of your boundaries.

(or)

End up dead and you just get found deep,

6 feet in a hole,

nigga 16 put your soul, where them clouds be.

Them Pearly Gates…

Open and you up next to see an early grave,

While I’m hoping for FutureSex with a “Dirty Babe”… ( a Justin Timberlake reference to his hit album and the lead off single)

Have her making Love Sounds,

this that O.J. audiobook,

bloody glove found! (Before his last conviction, O.J. Simpson wrote a book titled What If I Did It? Speculating about the murder of his ex-wife thru hypothetical implications. I compare this track to an audio version of murder speculation and pondering such as his. The bloody glove referring to the infamous other glove that was never found at the scene of the crime)

If you’re not religiously Christian then don’t cross me, (Wordplay. Cross as a verb and noun – reference to Christian imagery and the act of being antagonized)

(I) beat ’em with Bibles,

hit ’em with Matthew :14

You lost b?

I’ll help you find a God,

I’m not violent at all – but your kind of dialogue,

is Vagina Monologue. ( A popular underground annual event celebrating feminists writings and recitation)

So half your niggas asking if it’s real,

the way you rap is bitch,

you need to splash your lips with Massengil!

You got pussy mouth, ( a derogatory statement that plays off of a metaphor, pointing to the fact that the rapper being addressed is expressing more feminine traits than masculine by his use of words. Kinda sexist, I know)

dush it out,

have you regretting the day that your mama pushed you out,

you’ll be dying to go back in the other way!”

(HOOK)

VERSE 2

“I guess I’m back up on my Brandy shit…

Killing muthafuckas by accident…

that was in bad taste – wait,

let me bring it back again;

They say that I don’t sound like the average New York rapper – Shit!

Who the fuck wanna sound like the average New York rapper – shiiiiittt!!

You can have the shit,

you think in the box – I think out more,

‘fuck is everybody still mad at the south for?!’ (paraphrased from a Jadakiss line that Fat Joe a.k.a “Joey Crack” re-used to address rappers complaining about the popularity of southern rap)

Crack I was listenin’…

Crabs in a barrel – so I’m in this bitch,

with my crabcracker and a bib… For that cleanliness…(If the game is synonymous to the crabs in a barrel allegory, then me with a crabcracker is symbolic to me killing and eating the competition)

And you know that cleanliness is next to Godliness,

so it’s obvious that ya’ll some fuckin’ sinners an…

What’s the last thing you did for New York??

Your actions show,

that you Love New York bout as much as them faggots on that show! (a reference to the old “reality” show I Love New York; a horribly staged and scripted dating contest filled with a slew of questionable male contestants)

Bad actin – I’m Patch Adams, I’m clownin cats that’s on,

their deathbed, 

give them a laugh or so ‘fore they tag their toe! (a movie where Robin Williams portrayed a clown who touched the hearts of patients in a hospice. Metaphor)

You wont be happy til your new car’s a hearse,

actin too hard’ll, get you scarred,

or FUBAR, (fucked up beyond all recognition. See Tango & Cash)

or worse!”

(HOOK)

VERSE 3

“When it comes to that hood shit…

And it come to the question of who keep ’em guessin on whether he could spit…

I don’t make the impression like I was the best but I’m next on that good list…

And I come unexpected – ain’t no one suspect that this nigga here could twist…

So that’s why I put effort and never just mail the envelope – I push it! (‘Push the envelope’, meaning, break new ground and push boundaries as opposed to playing it safe – ‘mailing’ the envelope)

While,

ya’ll niggas wanna spit that trash…

I don’t get mad and steaming,

I get GLAD and even and I put ’em in a Ziplock bag. (Trashbag references. Bagging the competition up and getting rid of them)

But, when they put it in a Hip-Hop mag,

everybody run and wanna go read bout,

how they bustin’ guns and their so G’d out,

with a body in the trunk that they sold keys out.

But he keep it crunk – muthafucka Lik’s bout, (from this point on, I refer to myself in third person)

the particular motion niggas is goin’ – they goin’ all wrong,

while he quicker than most of them,

he isn’t for boastin’ and braggin’ how the toast and Magnum get blown!

(No!)

His approach is action – it’s shown,

as opposed to flapping his tongue,

I speak a little piece,

but you bring it to Malik,

and the heat’ll be the reason you gone!

Oh!

does it have to come to this,

No!

Do you have to jump to this??!

Conclusion…

That’ll get you nothing more than a lot of blood loss and contusions!

It is a little harsh,

but you piss a nigga off and you livin in a false, illusion…

And he don’t want no problems,

but if you thinkin’ that we got one,

then let’s prove it!”

Hope you learned something…

To listen to or download this song, click the picture of the cover below

5 Years of MALIK-16

September 25th 2006.

My Website popped up on the internet. My appearance on RapCity aired. My Myspace page was created. And the rapper known as Malik-16 was introduced to the world with a 100 bar rap to announce it.

It’s been 5 years.

I’d just like to thank you all for the ride.

Take a minute to click on the picture above and check out the site where it all started and you can see exactly why this day is so important to me.

Thank you again…

Hot 16…Or More… “FRIENDS”

This is a track that I had been wanting to write since the inception of the very first Crazy 8’s mixtape. Don’t ask me why….I just always wanted to flip the “If I Ruled The World (Imagine That)” instrumental and take it back to it’s original sample from Whodini‘s “Friends” and their original subject of discussion. I had Nas‘ version of the beat sitting around for 2 years, then I finally wrote and recorded it. I wanted it to be simple, just like the beat – because let’s be honest, it’s not a crazy mindblowing instrumental or anything. It’s just a casual 80’s hip-hop break with an unassuming thump. What was most important to me was getting my thoughts across about how I felt about friendship in general. I had just experienced some fallbacks and fallouts with some homies involved in music as well as an unecessary confrontation with a jealous boyfriend of a former female associate of mine who I was catching feelings for. This was all pre-Facebook Malik, so I had lost contact with alot of folks and regained contact with more than I’ve ever had at once, all via the Myspace era. It was a great atmosphere for this kind of track to come out. So on the deluxe version of The Crazy 8’s, I gave you

“Friends” (here I’ll share verses 1 and 2)

VERSE 1

“Fuck friends, relationships and everything with it, (A nod to Nas’ opening line on his version of this song)

I think different…

Dj Q45 (as in the dude who hosted Rap City when I appeared on it and told me to take his information down only to never respond when I reached out) witnessed…

How the boy made history (I was the first unsigned rapper ever to get a whole interview and booth time on BET’s fabled and now defunct hip-hop video show)

-simply a born winner at winning things,

but even Q45 switched it!

-an,

Fronted on me like he really in that position,

really, he should feel priveleged that his name gettin’ mentioned!

And that goes for any journalist, with any conviction,

who missed it when I was hitting them to get ’em to listen!

And I know that sound bitter but I did it,

cause I knew if I started off dissin’ – it would get your attention.

Now for today’s lesson – it’s the business of friendship;

this can be the beginning of a beautiful ending.

Cause some friendships is kept, cause what it took…

To maintain it, but the strain that it can start up to put,

is just as bad as if you let it fall apart – need a push!

I learned from experience and Dale Carnegie (the esteemed author of the infamous How To Win Friends And Influence People) books about…

Friends!!”

VERSE 2

“It’s hard for me to say I Love friends,

cause I done fucked friends,

and made enemies out of shorty’s husbands! (I’m using this term loosely and literally)

And I would like to tell you that it never happens often, (key words being “I would like to”)

I just lost a friend because her boyfriend was hawking!

Stalking…

Checking messages, sending threats – but since,

I’m a threat to him – he should’ve took that as a lesson in…

Women,

cause if you don’t attend to them and treat ’em like a gem then,

they gon’ get it from the next nigga who’s willing and…

I do admit I overstepped a bit,

talking all that sex an’ shit,

but it all began with being friends and then

Again…

It goes to show that men and women wasn’t ever meant to just be platonic and that’s the end of it.

So to my friend – Ms. – to the death I miss you,

guess we’ll meet again when that nigga’s your ex,

best of wishes…

My best friend in high school was a girl,

guess your friends are reflections of how you view the world

– We was lames!

Ain’t even know how to scoop a bird

– we became,

grown men, pimpin’ – grew some nerve!

-rearranged,

metamorph us out into the world

people change

That’s why I’m conscious how I use the word; (most important line of the whole track)

Friends!!”

 

Hope you learned something…

 

To listen to or download this track, click the mixtape cover below

Hot 16…Or More…”She’s Ridin In My Hooptie”

Back when I thought I was gonna be a a big deal R&B songwriter circa 2004, I started honing my chops by writing ditties over instrumentals of whatever was hot at the time – mostly Hip-Hop. This lead to the eventual composing of 30 songs over such beats.

I was a fan of the revolution that was going on with the handful of innovative R&B producers who were changing the game by not simply crafting songs with singers belting and riffing their hearts out over some hip-hop sampled beat or knock-off of a hit sound. No, what these new movers and shakers were doing was creating a new sound that was comparable to the Hip-Hop club bangers so much so that rappers began freestyling over those beats, and they were coupling them with clever lyrics and melodies that were more dense and nimble. This wasn’t the new Jack swing era. It wasn’t just singing like a church boy over a remix of  “The Benjamins”, it was a genuine marriage of R&b flair with hip-hop sensibilities.

Unfortunately, from these kinds of movements, the bastardization and microwaving has spawned and given us the rap & b subgenre, full of love songs filled with slang, autotune and singers delivering their verses like rappers. This works 2 ways with me; as a listener, I absolutely HATE hearing this kind of crap from professional R&B singers who call themselves artists. It’s disposable. However, because I am a rapper, I applaud it when I hear rap artists expand their boundaries and make these kinds of songs employing vocals and use of melody. I figure if a rapper is going to sing or get melodic, it should definitely maintain the rap nuances and not sound like a complete crossover into sappy territory.

As a songwriter, I’m less discriminating. Whatever gets the money is my motto. I know, it’s bad if I contribute to the very thing that I despise, but I still wouldn’t do anything cliche, eye-roll inducing or wack. It’s always going to have my style in it. Creativity comes first. And if nothing is truly new under the sun, then I will always find a way to say the same old thing differently.

So out of my seminal batch of 30, I tried the conventional and the conceptual. In the midst of  this came one gem of a song to me that I thought was so dope, I might just keep for myself.

Inspired by the purchase of my first car, I penned a song over the instrumental to 8Ball & MJG‘s “Look At The Grillz” off of an instrumental mixtape that I bought to help write the 30. It was screaming for a concept. It was street, but I could make it clever. I decided to play up on the car angle and make a cute track about love that prevails through struggling times…The struggling times being embodied and exemplified by a broken down old ride. I lost the beat, couldn’t find that version of it again, and after 2 years, decided since nothing was going on with it, I would in fact use it for myself. So I actually went to one of those crazy mixtape sites to re-find that mixtape that I originally got it from and wrote 2 rap verses for it to fill it out and keep it Hip-Hop. I wasn’t sure what my singing voice would be like for the style that I wrote it in, so I wanted to make sure my rap verses were just as present and memorable.

Since it was one of my first recordings in 2006, it became the song that rounded out my first ever project, The Crazy 8’s. It’s one of my most popular and among the favorites from my listeners. Having that said, here’s verses 1 & 2 from

 

“She’s Ridin In My Hooptie”


“(Look at the grillz)

On them hoopties – you see ’em ridin’ past,

feet on the gas brake – they screechin’, speedin’ and ridin’ fast.

Cause they’re embarrassed – don’t want you to see ’em ridin’ that,

they park 10 aves up from where they need – then they ride a cab…

(Why is that??)

Cause a pinto is a pinto, and it’s hard to stay in pimp mode,

when you can’t get out your car, without rolling down the window!

When the dealer gives you lemons, you should make lemonade,

but you can’t pick up no women when your whip is missing paint.

Ain’t no T.V. screens, DVD’s,

Negro please!

You see these things??!

Those (are) called tapes!

You probably don’t know how they look if you were born past ’88!

And my car…

Is older than my nephews and nieces,

I keep a couple things together with a special adhesive…

Called gum,

call uhmm…

Triple A – guess you need it,

when your car ain’t got no hydraulics – but it’s definitely leaning!

Now I’m sittin’ sideways, and I didn’t even mean it,

but as soon as I fix it – you sittin’ right there when I need it

(now sing it).

 

VERSE 2

 

See?

my 4 do’…

car,

is a Toyoooo…

ta,

and I got old…

Parts sittin’ in the back – that need to be attached, cause the truth is,

I don’t knoowww…

Just,

what they’re all fo’,

an’ that’s why I take off slooow…

cause it’s a habit that if I give too much gas, then I know that the brakes gon’ stall…

And I can’t be crashin’,

cause it just happens,

that they made this car waay-waay back when,

they ain’t install and equip no airbags in the dash yet!

My CD player’s hooked to a tape cause I need a beat…

But my gas light come on, so my car cuts off in the street!

And I ain’t complainin’ – it gets me from A to B and I keep it,

But damn, I’m sayin’ man, where’s Xzibit when you need him??

(Or)

Maybe I can fix it myself,

get a whole new system,

cause my speakers only play on the left,

and I need new rims man!

(Hey!)

This’ for my 10 dollar players – puttin’ $6 on the gas,

who save the other $4 for comin’ back later,

cause it gets pretty bad!

(But back to what really matters)

She know it won’t always be,

like this, and my chic is the baddest, because she ridin’ with me!!”

 

Hope you learned something…

Click the Pic of the cover below to listen to and download this track.

 

 

 

*SOUL BROTHERS Reunion Show ft. MALIK-16!! Tomorrow!!!*

Be There, Or Be Square….

New Malik-16 Mixtape dropping Sept.16th!!

Refinedhype.com & 16’s Candles present

(Click the pic to hear sample from mixtape)

SEPTEMBER 16TH

Ok, Don’t say you weren’t told…

Do You KNOW Who Iam?

Hello There.

My team doesn’t seem to think that you guys know who I am.
They think you’ve been to 16’s Candles but never to Malik-16.com.
They think you’ve been to Malik-16.com but never to 16’s Candles.

They think my layout is too spastic here, and too plain there.
They think I confuse you.

They think you know me as a blogger, but not as the rapper which is the purpose why this blog exists in the first place. But that would mean that you all didn’t read the Why 16? page now wouldn’t it?

And perhaps there is some truth to this, but I’d rather hear that from you – the people who actually read this blog. I thought I was doing quite a good job, but admittedly so, I could have been making a better effort to let you know that Iam consistently working on music and telling you where to find it. Please take into consideration that I made the conscious decison earlier this year to eliminate as much confusion as possible by turning my home site, http://www.malik-16.com/ into a stationary site with a static page that refers you here for all things New and Fresh with me. THERE is my hub, my namesake. It’s where you go to learn about me and introduce yourself to this guy with a number in his name that you probably still don’t understand. It’s where you can see where I made history on BET, see my first full bio, my first EPK and download my very first solo projects that I put out into the world. The co-signs by some of your favorite Bloggers and underground rappers in the beginning doesn’t hurt either (Although, somehow my team thinks it is in whatever way, calling it “distracting”).

HERE, is where you come to get to know me; The Man, The Artist, The Writer, The Lover, The flawed human being who says ridiculous things and no, doesn’t like everybody and sometimes has typos because he does everything alone.

Something to remember.

I’ve been doing everything myself for my career up to this point. That includes halfway designing every layout from my Myspace page to my website. I’ve secured any connects I have so far and any collabs, friendships etc., and I’d like to believe that you come here truly out of interest, curiosity and the results of that hardwork that I’ve put in. I haven’t been a blog-darling, so I started my own. And thanks to the good words of my homegirl, Starrene, I chose to make it more literary and editorialist based. Meaning yeah, you should be ready to READ when you come here! I don’t have anybody’s exclusives but my own. I’m not a fashionista and I don’t have gossip – unless you count…
And yes, I’ve addressed the whole thing of where to find my music. Depending on what kind of browser you have, check the right side of this site or the bottom and click on any of those mixtape covers to go to a place where you can hear my catalogue (except for the first 2 mixtapes – you STILL gotta go to http://www.malik-16.com/ to get those in full). Also, there’s a nice little tab on top of the header (you know, the one with the round Black woman asses on the right?) and it says what? Music. Click on either.

And Of Course, I also put my website logo all over the place so you can go there and see what’s up.

And now, just in case that’s not enough, don’t forget I got a show tomorrow and a whole freestyle series going on with a hip-hop website. Click this pic in case you missed it.

Now we know each other. Nice meeting you…