(18) Classic Sounds…

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My big sister Veen‘s greatest contribution to my life besides my nephews is the enhancement of my music knowledge. She is single-handedly responsible for me knowing artists, songs and albums by name, as well as learning what a single is, who belonged to what click back in the early 90’s and how to learn song lyrics by not just hearing the radio, but listening to it.

As she got older, she branched out and started her family and the music notes and convo scaled down considerably, but what did happen as an effect of her dating the man who became the father of my 2 nephews and who I just dedicated an R.I.P. post to 2 months ago, was a music matrimony. Her love of R&B and Hip-Hop paired with his being in the business meant a whole compact disc library for young adolescent me to get lost in. Especially in the era of Columbia House CD ordering catalogues and the like. I learned about Prince from them, as well as a slew of all the contemporary urban music. If I’m not mistaken, this is where I first listened to Reasonable Doubt, reading the liner notes of every disc they had. I used to absolutely love going to their place! Not only because it had the most homely and lush decorative touches that I had seen in a small apartment (suede orange walls and deluxe carpeting throughout with a huge tv – before flatscreens took over), but mostly because of the snacks and entertainment. I fashioned my idea of adult apartment living to be like that.

My sister would throw on the cd’s from the Playstation or the Dreamcast (throwback right?) and let the default screen make spacey images on the tv while she cleaned up. One of these cd’s was the debut album of one of the most distinctive female rappers in history and one of the most unique rappers period. I remembered her ironically from watching videos with Veen a year and a half before and seeing her appear on a cut called “Da Ladies In The House” with a then burgeoning Lauryn Hill. Safe to say, I was intrigued.

After being in the habit of reading the liner notes and seeing that her album shared production credits from all the producers I loved and respected at the time from all the albums that I loved and respected, I was more than intrigued. Kollage is an honest attempt at just that; it’s more of a very concise effort to balance out 3 recurring elements than a collage of eclectic sounds, influences or moods. As a listener, you’ll see the pattern easily if you pay attention. The 3 modes are those provided by the 3 main revolving producers here (4 if you separate Gangstarr into the separate production entities of GURU and Premier), and they fluctuate from light and atmospheric experimental sounds to jazzy, funk guitar-laden grooves and the era-appropriate 90’s east coast hardcore sound. Although this is highly due to the chosen production styles of the men behind the boards, this is also a compliment to Bahamadia’s two different tones.

Assuming you know your contemporary Philly music history, then you know about the scene that spawned the famous Black Lily gatherings, shepherded by The Roots and giving rise to spoken word artists and neo-soul trailblazers in the late 90’s and early 2000’s. It would be safe to assume that this has been an aspect of Philly’s music scene for a long time now. It would also be safe to assume that like half of all female rappers, Bahamadia probably started as a poet. This is usually easy to infer from her spoken word cadence that vacillates from stacatto to continuous and overlapping. Something that matches up perfectly with her voice which carries a moistness and quiet matter-of-factness to it. Yet she sounds right at home on the harder tracks and picks up the energy and force to attack the tracks and owns them. It’s on the brightest moments on the album where she finds the happy medium between the super laid-back and the energetic.

Those moments are those like on the intro “Wordplay” and the album’s main singles like “Uknowhowwedu” &  “3 The Hardway”  On the former, Bahamadia makes her intro and thesis statement by giving a synopsis of what to expect from her debut over a minimalist GURU beat that bounces on stuttering drums, and is buffered by horns and dominated by a funky bassline. Like his other contribution to the album, the harder edged “Total Wreck”, it’s clear that GURU was still very much in the vibe of his second Jazzmatazz installment. “Total Wreck” is another stripped down beat – probably the most purely boom-bap on the album, so naturally it sees Bahamadia on her more boisterous kick. In my opinion, neither of these songs are special, but they’re also not wack and don’t serve as agents of interruption to the flow of the LP.

She hits the mark and evokes more response on the other hardcore outing, the Dj Premier produced “Rugged Ruff”. On a signature Premo 90’s beat that sounds like it should have been on one of Gangstarr’s classic albums, Bahamadia makes you wonder why she didn’t just let Premo produce 90% of the album. As a matter of fact, he’s the soundsmith behind all of the best songs on the LP. She enters  like a God-send, taking those who have been listening thus far for a loop by raping Kool G Rap‘s rapid fire non-pause flow with super vocab and lines like “Scriptures glitters like diamonds or sparkle like magnesium/Premium equates the medium which blows me up like helium…pumped up more jams than technotronic/Find it more toxic than hydrocarbon…” 

The Poet-influenced mode is more dominant on this album however, providing all of the sleepy moments on the album when coupled with lackluster production. The experimental and spacey but dark “Innovation” produced by the Beatminerz seems to be the weaker of the twins from the two beats that they provide. Bahamadia sounds like spoken word legend Jessica Care-Moore or like Lauryn Hill after hiatus as she basically talks(not raps) off beat in a choppy style. It’s on the 2 efforts by N.O. Joe however, where the album has it’s saccharin heights. It gets downright cheesy on the requisite album love song “I Confess”. It sounds like something from a smooth jazz radio station with it’s horrible interpolation of Marvin Gaye’s “Let’s Get It On” and doesn’t sound quite sexy coming from Bahamadia, although I do remember hearing it get a good amount of play on Philly radio. The other sapfest is on the album’s closing track “Biggest Part Of Me”, with yet another singing chorus which seems to be what everyone believed was necessary for a smooth or heartfelt song back then. Although the overall feel is corny, this is a great moment in Hip-Hop where you get the rare perspective of parenthood, especially from a mother’s angle. And what Bahamadia says in this song is actually really dope. It’s her testament to her children that’s forever cemented in audio history. It’s these 2 tracks produced by N.O. Joe that sound like they could have worked so much better if they were produced by The Roots because they incorporate similar elements in instrumentation. Ironically, it’s on the only song that features The Roots and is produced by them that her poet style doesn’t seem so snoozy.  On “Da Jawn” (which is Philly slang for everything practically – like “Joint” in New York slang) Black Thought and Malik B.‘s flows bolster the otherwise weak Roots offering and make Bahamadia’s mellow delivery seem right in pocket. The track where she shines the most in her poet syle tho, is the other Beatminerz contribution “Spontaneity”. Using the same sample they used for Heltah Skeltah‘s “Lefluar Leflah Eshkoshka”, the production duo strike gold this time around with the hypnotic and chimey track that allows Bahamadia to capitalize on her quiet storm by explaining her quirky style and whispering the hook. 

As a member of the Gangstarr foundation, Bahamadia had one of the most important co-signs of the 90’s. The extended embrace from The Roots added to that and made her one of the most significant female entrances into the game ever. More significantly, years later, she is the only major female rapper (sorry, QueenPen doesn’t count – even tho she has bigger hits), let alone rapper in general, who I have heard blatantly admit to bisexuality in song. It was on a mixtape by Outcasted female spitters Lady Luck, Babs and the Lady of Rage that featured Bahamadia on a track rhyming “last decade had a harem of dime women friends/bi on the sly/done a guy every now and then”. That’s balls. And maybe she’s at that point in her life where she no longer cares what people think. Maybe that’s also why this has been her only real full length album and has been followed by a few sporadic EP’s and side projects. Her signature beehive afro helped that heavily backed introduction with a style that was as unique as her rap presence, and tho she’s switched it up over the years and become rather obscure, her mark was definitely made. Call her sleepy if you want. But don’t sleep.

With that, I’m sure it’s become quite obvious after reading this review that my favorite tracks on this album are “Rugged Ruff”, “Spontaneity” and the singles “3 The Hardway”, and the super Dope ode to Philly hip-hop “Uknowhowwedu” . But the crown jewel of this whole album is “True Honey Buns”, a tale where she cleverly and slickly describes how going out with a friend who becomes loose in the midst of male attention speaks volumes to the challenges facing the female agenda collectively. Complex simplicity. You almost feel like you’re out at the club with them. 

And with that, this album gets 12 Candles out of a possible

4812 or 16.

4(Classic Just because where it stands in Hip-Hop, whether it be the time of it’s release, it’s influence, or the popularity of it’s singles overall)

8(Classic because it was solid for it’s time, but may be a little dated or less than amazing by today’s standards)

12(Classic as a complete release and probably celebrated widely on the surface, but possibly lacking one key element – be it one song that doesn’t fit, a wack guest appearance, lyrics, lack of depth or beats)

16(Classic all around)

(It’s more like a 10)

More Negroes In The News – 2pac movie is coming, Tru-Life gets years for Murder, but this Philly kid deserves the chair!!

Ahhh, to be a minority.

Since I slacked last month, and this is  Black History Month, I figure a double dose of Negroes In The News is in order.

First off and most importantly, the good news;

There’s a 2Pac movie in the making and the casting will begin at the end of this month. Not Only is the film – tentatively titled All Eyez On Me, a biopic of my favorite rapper of all time, but it’s also being helmed by my favorite Black director, Antoine Fuqua (The man who brought you King Arthur, Brooklyn’s Finest and Training Day). There’s going to be an online casting contest where unknowns who feel like they can capture the look and essence of Tupac Shakur can participate in a virtual audition for the lead role as fans vote. I am super glad that they’re deciding to go the newcomer route. 2Pac’s personality is too strong and distinctive to have someone who we have envisioned in other roles blur that. I’m a fan of Anthony Mackie‘s acting, but his portrayal of Pac in the slopfest that was Notorious did not hit the mark. I can’t begin to imagine the pressure that Fuqua might feel to ensure that this movie doesn’t fall to similar criticism. There’s not much room for this story to get watered down. Pac’s life is a layered one, with many paradoxical elements and real historic points. Hope he consults with John Singleton on this one as well.

Now, the ugly…

You ever notice how Jay-Z distances himself from his former artists and associates right before they screw themselves out of the chance of a lifetime?? Call it the touch. He’s almost like those cartoon characters that see the anvil about to fall on who they’re standing next to and eases away without warning them of the impending doom.

He has good reason tho. Take for instance last fall’s major federal drug sweep that scooped up his former Roc-A-Fella partner Kareem “Biggs” Burke. While this self-destruction was more delayed than the usual 6 month to a year downfall timeframe for former Jay-Z affiliates, it still goes to show. For all we know, Biggs could’ve been dabbling in this shit at the onset of the Roc-A-Fella break-up and that could have contributed to Jay moving away because it’s so below the scale of what they were trying to do. On the other hand, this could just be the by-product of that very break-up and something that Biggs felt he had to resort back to doing to make up for the deficit caused by not generating industry revenue like he used to in the hey-days.

In either case, Jay must have had that same foresight when he quietly left Trouble-making rapper Tru-Life behind and pulled the plug on the experimental Roc La Familia imprint. 

Tru life and his real-life brother have found themselves charged with murder for what police are deeming as a retaliatory crime over an ongoing street beef. Taking plea agreements, Tru now faces a 10 year bid and his brother a 12 year stint for his role in the act. I guess that beats the inevitable 25 to Life that they would otherwise be serving, but damn niggas…There’s never really been a question about Tru Life’s involvement and connection to the streets. Dipset tried to make light of it during the heat of their rap spat that was more of a deflection of the real tension with Jay, but their taunting never hit any nerves. This is a guy who first started making waves by appearing on street DVD’s bragging about his crew bustin’ off shots and how they ran up in Mobb Deep‘s recording studio with guns ready to rob the group for backtracking on a verse. Once again, I wonder, is this the result of Jay dropping the kid and leaving him an unsigned, hungry, disgruntled rapper who only saw going back to the streets as an option?? Or is this the shit that the kid was on out of knuckle-headed impatience that made Jay dip in the first place?? Whatever the case is (and apparently, Murder was the case that they gave him), this is when keeping it real doesn’t pay. No one can give you years back off your life. And that’s Tru.

It gets better, order another round

This bastard here just admitted to killing his mother back in November after Thanksgiving in Philadelphia. How did he kill her? With a claw hammer. Why did he kill her? Because they had a 90 minute argument that ended with the 37 year old single mom taking his PlayStation system away. Not only did the 16 year old son strike his mother 20 times in her sleep with the Hammer, this was something that he spent 3 hours thinking about after the argument took place. I don’t even want to say anymore. Read the full story here. http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/2011/02/17/2011-02-17_teen_kills_mom_with_claw_hammer_for_taking_away_his_playstation_court.html

One thing about Negroes (and yes that includes hispanics and other brown minorities) is that they never cease to amaze, shock and awe you. Whether good or bad.