Why did this ad REALLY Come down??? Maybe this film knows…

So by now, you’ve all seen the ad that has everyone up in arms. Controversial is an understatement. 

While the overall reaction to this ad was one of unanimous disapproval, the subsequent thoughts from the frenzy have been loosely divided. However, that’s only a by-product of the ever polarizing debate on abortion itself.

Whether or not the numbers provided by the organization behind the ad that claimed Blacks are at ridiculously high rates of abortion cases in the country are factual, the real issue here is why Blacks show up in high percentages in these statistics in the first place. Whether that number is 20%, 35% or 63%, as only 12% of the population in the U.S. , with an already high number incarcerated, any number in the double digits should be unacceptable for Blacks. It’s an indication that something is very wrong, as I can assure you that while every woman should have her choice, there is NOTHING ok about abortion.

I’ve read from comments on this that it is another attack on Black women and their right to choose. That it’s an inferiority tactic aimed to make Black women feel insecure and uncomfortable. If you remember from a previous post that I wrote on these so called “Attacks” on African-American women, this is still just pseudo feminist rhetoric that I  don’t get the logic in. Why would this be a desired outcome? What gain comes from this by the evil factions and powers at play? Just mind games? Ehh…

A more grounded and unfortunately grisly view may be the one that this organization horribly attempted to get across with this fuck-up of an ad. This is the view that organizations such as Planned Parenthood target minorities with a form of coaxing to give up their pregnancies under the guise of empathy. It lends itself to the more stark and grim idea of population control.

This may be old news to some of you, but a heavy documentary about this was released 2 years ago called MAAFA 21. It centers around the Eugenics movement and how it targeted African-Americans and Blacks globally  in attempts to stifle the rise and initially, the continuation of the race. There are excerpts from historical documents and newsletters, the origins of Planned Parenthood and it’s agenda are unearthed, and there’s even a connection between genocide and Charles Darwin‘s theories.

If you have never seen this film, I suggest you look for it and watch it and come to your own conclusions. It definitely has a slant, but is backed by so much empirical evidence, that room for falsehood is little. I don’t know how long this link will exist, but I watched it in 3 parts on a Chinese site here http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/3s6MHdSdehA/

If not, the official site is http://www.maafa21.com/

Harlem: Pictures worth 1,000 words…

While I’m at it, There’s this Dope exhibit going on in my hometown about my hometown by a great photographic artist.

(how cool is this kid?)

Dawoud Bey’s Harlem, USA is an art exhibit at The Studio Museum of Harlem, which is a sorely overlooked treasure smack dab in the middle of 125th that Blacks don’t take enough interest in and advantage of. It’s a photographic look at the people and identities that have created this enormously historic and popular landmark area of NYC. This small stretch of land between roughly 100 blocks has always been a subcultural epicenter in African-American history, and these vintage images display just how.

Although the work has been showcased since November 11th, it has just gained notoreity this Black History Month. It will go on until March 13th. Make a trip as soon as you can and support dope art and the history of the greatest part of the greatest boro! Show the gift shop some love. Shout out to Indigo!

What IS the BLACKEST last name???

It would seem that the answer is; Washington.

This is a casual conversation that I have often. Kinda funny to see it as an official headline on my Yahoo! News feed. As this Black History Month comes to a close, this little write-up fits in just right so let’s see how much we know about what we think we know…

This question comes from the findings from an experimental tangent of the Census poll from the year 2000. Although this wasn’t repeated for last year’s Census, you can imagine that the wave of African-American surnames hasn’t changed dramatically in 10 years. Unfortunately, the same can’t be said for Black first names (see; Alize, Starkeisha). Nevertheless, the results showed that of the top 1,000 most popular last names in America, Washington was number 138, counting 163,036 people bearing it, and 90% of those people being African -Americans. That 90% translated to 146,520, and that percentage was the highest for Blacks out of all of the last names, making it statistically the most prominent among African-Americans.

Surprisingly, Jefferson was # 2, rounding out as about 75% Black. Jackson was only 53% Black (tho I’ve never met a non-Black Jackson. Guess I’m not as worldly as I think). And Williams was only 46% Black. In an ironic twist, the last name Black was 68% White.

For a deeper look at this interesting tidbit of modern Black history, complete with historical relevance and slavery ties, check out this link to the full article – written by an African-American editorialist by the name of Jesse Washingtonhttp://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110221/ap_on_re_us/us_the_blackest_name

And to think, all this time I thought the Blackest last name was Jenkins

(12) Classic Sounds…

Like…

The Hip-Hop purists (and no, I’m not one of those), well at least the 90’s-centric ones, all may seem to be in agreement that his best album is Resurrection, and the neo-purists rave about Like Water For Chocolate. I challenge both notions with the assertion and dissection of the sinfully overlooked third album as the best. With a long running track record of each album coming in 2 year intervals, One Day It’ll All Make Sense rests smack dab in the middle of both critical darlings mentioned above. Due to its positioning before the first of his dramatic transformations, and the place where Com was as an artist, this album delivers the most balance of his whole career. Resurrection exhibited the height of his sophomoric wit and slippery early 90’s flow and showed the first glimmerings of potential for depth and introspection. Like Water found us with a new, calm voiced – almost monotone, veggie eating Com who wanted to light incense and rhyme over hipster grooves while contemplating on the nuances and ironies of life. This album was the meeting of both of those sensibilities; The Epilogue of one, the Prelude to another, without giving way to one side more than the other. It’s quite a linear transition. A natural artistic growth that unfortunately has brought him to a point that has stained everyone’s mind with only the image of him from the Like Water album on (mostly because that album spawned his very first and biggest radio hit, “The Light”), and pigeonholed him as the poster-boy and go-to-guy for conscious, heartfelt and poetic rap. This is something that he helped foster by his choices, but also something that he’s been trying so hard to shake because no artist likes to be boxed in. So consequently, One Day It’ll All Make Sense is the first album without the word Sense in the moniker, but also the last album where we see Common for what he really has always been; just a regular dude finding his way….A real man, a Chicago-ass nigga from the burbs and the hood who rapped his ass off and wanted you to know it! One of the most prolific and creative rappers of all time who survived the changes of the 90’s without smash hits and wanted to show you just how much he loved his city and wordplay. This album is where he tagged his name all over the shit and did it the most honestly and effortlessly.

Never really the one to be  accused of chasing the commercial wave, Com seemed to always accept his place as a non-mainstream fixture in Hip-Hop as long as it was known that he’s a fixture. So he’s never given the appearance that he makes albums with concern over what’s going to be the single. When listening to Resurrection, I don’t think anyone can tell you what the possible singles could have been. Even the famed “I Used To Love H.E.R.” is not a conventional single. It’s an A&R’s nightmare, even for a 1994/95 recording. That album felt like he got all of the stuff that he had on his mind at the time out in the open unabashedly. Maybe it was the youth in him, or the progression from his concern with being a style-over-substance entertainer that was evident on his first album, but it was certainly not with any commercial vision. With an open-book quality in his music and in his approach to it, getting all of the stuff that he has on his mind at the time out is pretty much the feel of all of his albums dating from Resurrection, but on One Day it becomes apparent that he learned the value of a little mass appeal along the way. And by little, I mean little. Common is an organic emcee. He’s not going to jump on a Timbaland track just because that’s what you’re supposed to do. He’s going to reach a broader audience on his own terms, when he feels it won’t hurt the process of his growth or the feel of his project. So there may be a track with a more uptempo pace and a choppy hook, or a track with Mary J. Blige or a nice, easy to rock to sample, but that’s the extent of Com’s reaching. He knows his fan base and he knows what would look just ridiculous on him.

So here, he met the masses halfway…His first single off of this album, and interestingly, the closing song (which is rare for lead singles to be placed sequentially) is “Reminding Me Of Sef” – a reflective single that borrows from a 70’s soul groove and features Chantay Savage on the chorus singing an interpolation of another old-school song, but a popular one. But ahh…Here it goes…Com plays it his way. He gave you all of those oh-so predictable and crucial elements to a hit Hip-Hop song in 1997, but he still gives the industry a slap in the face. When I saw this video debut on Rap City and Yo!MtvRaps, I was surprised myself that this was the first song to set the stage for the release of the album. Whether having Chantay Savage, a fellow Chicagoan, but D-list R&B singer (with the only claim to fame being a neo-soul remake of Gloria Gaynor‘s Disco classic “I Will Survive”) featured was a deliberate choice to middle finger the industry and keep it Chi instead of commissioning whoever was the it girl in R&B at the moment ( I’m guessing Mya??) or if her presence was a reflection of Com’s limited pull in the game and the wackness of his label, Relativity not being able to afford someone bigger like Monica or Brandy, is a good question. But even if he did go big with the guest feature, it doesn’t change the fact that Com slaps the biz in the face again by turning a sample that most rappers would have turned into the girl single into a platform to reminisce on his carefree days as a youth on Chicago’s Southside, and eulogize over a fallen homey. It’s quite autobiographical and potent in a way that makes the listener vicariously nostalgic. He takes advantage of the feel of the soul sample so well that he paints the picture vividly and relatable for a listener who has never even been to the midwest or lived through the 70’s and 80’s. It’s a great pairing, and Savage’s singing conjures up the emotions that are both triumphant and lamenting at the same time. Her voice adds power to the mellow of it all. 

If this was the lead single, and this was an example of him meeting the industry and the masses halfway while maintaining integrity, then he only met them a third of the way when he made “Retrospect For Life”. Another sample – this time from a lesser-known Stevie Wonder classic, is a super melancholy track that actually boosted the recognition of the original Stevie song afterwards. This is largely due to the appearance of the then, infallible Lauryn Hill, and her tear-jerking rendition of the hook. I’m almost moved to take back my earlier comments about Common’s pull and his label being wack and unable to foot the bill for big features when I consider all of the guests that were present on this album. But then, I have to remember that while they have moved on to be titans, icons and legends in our minds now, all of these guests, from Erykah Badu, Cee-Lo, The Roots, Canibus and even Lauryn were JUST becoming who we know them as now. This was 1997/98. Cee-Lo wasn’t a Gnarls Barkley pop-darling with Grammies yet. He was still the fat singing one from Goodie Mob, struggling to go gold. Erykah was still wearing the Headwrap and putting out singles from her first album, The Roots weren’t household names yet because their biggest single “I got you” was 2 years away, and Canibus and Lauryn’s solo debuts had not dropped yet. Canibus was still just the hottest mixtape commodity and Lauryn was a star, but not a superstar yet. Safe to say, Lauryn and Q-Tip were probably the most expensive features on this album then. And due to Tip’s minimal presence and the whole reinstated Native Tongues connection, much like De La‘s appearance, I’m sure the charge was skimmed down considerably, if not done for the love. But getting back to the song…This was the second single, A profound and instantly classic tome on the strain and reality of child-bearing, the state of modern Black male-female relationships and most notably and importantly, abortion. As 2 new parents, the connection between Lauryn and Com on this song just seemed meant to be. It made sense to both of their fanbases. It made sense in Life. The beat went perfect with Common’s tone, and in the era of slam poetry’s rise to popularity, it read like something straight off of Def Poets. His words are indelible. This is one of those hip-hop classics that carved itself as the 1 for this topic. Much like Method Man set the standard for Hip-Hop love songs with “All I Need”. Almost every woman references this song for deep hip-hop. With lines like “there’s too many Black women who can say that they’re mothers but not wives”, what you get here is a Common that wasn’t present on the previous 2 albums. It’s a maturity that made you feel like you grew with him if you were a day-1 fan. It became his first true radio hit with regular airplay, although it’s so atypical in sound and subject matter. This was groundbreaking in itself that Common defied the norm and won, even if the win was mild and didn’t translate to sales. It speaks to the power of words. It also speaks to the incredible amount of respect that Lauryn garnered from her fellow artist community. Once again, where alot of rappers may have taken the opportunity to have her featured on a song to make a smash hit love song or something, based off the few who have gotten her on record- mainly Nas and Common, most rappers feel compelled to ask her to be on songs with substance. And this is one of several moments on the album where Com’s newfound love of such substantial fare gets brandished almost to a point where he seems like an adolescent who just finished puberty and wants to bone. He approached his more topical songs with full speed, going all the way to church and wanting to share his enlightenment eagerly with his audience. This was the dawn of the metamorphosis of Mr. Lynn into the Common that everyone thinks of now; soft-spoken, contemplative, philosophical and conscious. Ironically, there’s only 2 songs on this album like that – Retrospect being one, but they were soooo heavy and drenched in tone that they leave that much of an impact. I’m not sure if it’s all for the best.

The other of those 2 would be “G.O.D. (Gaining One’s Definition)” featuring Cee-Lo. This is what I mean when I said Com takes you all the way to Church with it. Yeah, the song is about looking into spirituality and defining yourself by what works for you and the moral codes that appear universal, but he takes it a step further with a dreary piano that feels like sunday morning. Cee-Lo’s southern church-boy crooning adds to that feel. On one hand, it’s mission accomplished because a feel is established, on the other hand, it’s very Spike Lee “message!” in your face with the blatant overdoing of a point that you probably could’ve gotten on your own over any beat just by listening to the verses. This was still a signifier of Common’s newness to sharing depth with his listeners. It almost sounded like he had spent the previous year speaking to spiritual advisers and having deep convos with his friends and he came to the studio saying ‘yeah man, I wanna put all these new thoughts into a deep song’. Similar to how you can tell when Erykah’s influence had taken over between Like Water and his experimental Electric Circus phases. It’s just an annoying thing, not anything that ruins the album per se. It’s slow, and it definitely augments the flow of things a little, but “G.O.D.” is still one of the deepest and lyrical hip-hop joints from the 90’s. There’s something to be appreciated by the naiveté that comes with being deliberate with a topic. It wasn’t sneaky or metaphoric. Com said, ‘hey I’m gonna make a song about religion, and here it go…’

Speaking of Erykah tho,

on “All Night Long”, the bubbling chemistry is there. You can tell Com moved on from the midwest hoodrats that he would often lambast on his prior albums and set his sights on the more coffee-shop variety. Over this beat that sounded like something straight from a jam session, Com describes his ideal mate. It’s neo-soul matrimony. 

But let’s focus on that irony that I mentioned earlier that makes this album a classic in the first place. Simply because this album is not about 2 prolific songs and a slew of guest appearances, it’s about the fact that Com is a beast and here he made it clear. The majority of songs on this album are songs where Com just lets loose and shows off his lyrical dexterity. Com is not often credited with crafting a rhyme style, but if Hip-Hop was a university, he’d definitely be a professor of 2 classes. In a way, he should be given the trophy for helping to pioneer emo-rap, along with Ghostface and a few others, but he should also be given his props for mastering wordplay. Com plays with synonyms and double entendres like none other, he was making pop culture references for punch lines before it became standard and reverses phrases and sentences til it’s Shakespearian. For examples of each, take on “Real Nigga Quotes” where he lays in “it’s gon’ be some drama – you try to Sit-Com down, this ain’t comedy!”, or on “Food For Funk” where he states “I got my mind made up like Foxy Brown’s Face”. Or on “Making A Name For Ourselves” where he rips “I make my Living off of Singles like Latifah/in-between sheets like Reefer/with, blunted senses/you couldn’t make a statement if you were from a sentence/I’m cold with numb intentions”.

Whoever accused Com of selling out at any point hasn’t paid attention. He’s always been a spitter. He’s always loved pussy but respected real women. He’s always incorporated jazz and funk into his music and that’s never changed. The defining factor on this album however, is that this is where you’ll hear the most boom-bap beats of his whole catalogue paired with dope verses. On the subsequent albums, you won’t hear anything like the attacking horns heard on “Real nigga Quotes” (you won’t even get titles like that from Com anymore), or the stutter of “1,2 many” or the rumbling of “Making A Name For Ourselves”. The samples were well-chosen here. There’s a menace to the funky “Gettin Down At The Amphitheater” that doesn’t compromise Com’s sense of hardcore, nor De La Soul’s presence on there. And with the scratches and old school bells, it feels like these guys were on the set of Krush Groove, battling.   The same can be said of “Making A Name…” Where most rappers may have felt the need to rap Canibus-esque and step their game up with him on the track, Com just seems to be comfortable being himself. And while he ups the aggression, he doesn’t change his flow or cadence to match up with the Canadian/east coaster who had other rappers on their toes back in the late 90’s. Most albums that are dominated by braggadocio tracks seemed drowned and tiring, but the sounds of every track where Common spits Southside Bravado are so different and varying from each other that it just makes it feel alive. It also helps that the placement of those songs is so good that just when you need to hear Com spit after a more mellow song, there you have it! Besides double albums and Raekwon‘s Only Built for Cuban Linx, It’s truly one of the few rap albums with more than 14 tracks that’s easy to listen to because of its variety and it’s sequencing.

Something that seems to get lost in the timestream is also the dopeness of Com’s storytelling. The lack of recognition of that seems to have shied Com away from doing it as much these days, but he’s really creative with it… Almost on a Nas level when he goes in on linear, continuous narratives. The one featured on this album is a 3 part tale entitled “Stolen Moments…” It’s simply art at it’s finest. You realize what rap is about when it’s used for this kind of thing. Complete with a skit to set things off that dramatizes the scenario, Com dedicates a long verse to each scene as he arrives home from a trip to find that his place has been robbed over a beat that lends itself to mystery. The beat switches to something more looming and creeping as he moves to the next phase, which is deducing who could be responsible and he’s angered by the fact that he lost a prized Donny Hathaway tape (yeah, I said tape). The last movement sees the pace pick up over a midtempo sample that plays like 70’s Blaxploitaion film chase music. It’s just dope to hear the story unravel and see how Com brings everything full circle with the tape and the skit and the pondering.

I’m not even sure if Common himself knew what he wanted to accomplish with this album besides just sharing his new wisdom and showing off the full extent of his skills. The opening track perhaps sums it up best when he says he wants to ‘open his mental window, hoping you climb in’ and comments how he’s been “doin’ it for a while”. But even more so, the theme of the album is set from the following track, “Invocation” where the jazzy beat is balanced with hard scratches and even harder lyrics by Com that straddle between bragging and life lessons. That there is what this album is about. It was sincere. It was against the tide of Hip-hop in it’s lost era post- Biggie and 2Pac, but it was undeniably Hip-Hop. With the exception of his zeal to be deep on those few tracks, and a slight sloppy slurring quality to his voice on his harder songs, every moment on here is pretty bright. Even the dope spoken word break by Malik Yusef.

My favorite tracks are “Reminding Me Of Sef”, “Stolen Moments..”, “Real Nigga Quotes” , the second and best ever of the  “Pop’s Rap” outros, “All Night Long” and the super Hip-Hop “Hungry”

This album gets 16 Candles out of a possible

4812 or 16.

4(Classic Just because where it stands in Hip-Hop, whether it be the time of it’s release, it’s influence, or the popularity of it’s singles overall)

8(Classic because it was solid for it’s time, but may be a little dated or less than amazing by today’s standards)

12(Classic as a complete release and probably celebrated widely on the surface, but possibly lacking one key element – be it one song that doesn’t fit, a wack guest appearance, lyrics, lack of depth or beats)

16(Classic all around)

If you don’t see why, One Day It’ll All Make Sense

More Negroes In The News – 2pac movie is coming, Tru-Life gets years for Murder, but this Philly kid deserves the chair!!

Ahhh, to be a minority.

Since I slacked last month, and this is  Black History Month, I figure a double dose of Negroes In The News is in order.

First off and most importantly, the good news;

There’s a 2Pac movie in the making and the casting will begin at the end of this month. Not Only is the film – tentatively titled All Eyez On Me, a biopic of my favorite rapper of all time, but it’s also being helmed by my favorite Black director, Antoine Fuqua (The man who brought you King Arthur, Brooklyn’s Finest and Training Day). There’s going to be an online casting contest where unknowns who feel like they can capture the look and essence of Tupac Shakur can participate in a virtual audition for the lead role as fans vote. I am super glad that they’re deciding to go the newcomer route. 2Pac’s personality is too strong and distinctive to have someone who we have envisioned in other roles blur that. I’m a fan of Anthony Mackie‘s acting, but his portrayal of Pac in the slopfest that was Notorious did not hit the mark. I can’t begin to imagine the pressure that Fuqua might feel to ensure that this movie doesn’t fall to similar criticism. There’s not much room for this story to get watered down. Pac’s life is a layered one, with many paradoxical elements and real historic points. Hope he consults with John Singleton on this one as well.

Now, the ugly…

You ever notice how Jay-Z distances himself from his former artists and associates right before they screw themselves out of the chance of a lifetime?? Call it the touch. He’s almost like those cartoon characters that see the anvil about to fall on who they’re standing next to and eases away without warning them of the impending doom.

He has good reason tho. Take for instance last fall’s major federal drug sweep that scooped up his former Roc-A-Fella partner Kareem “Biggs” Burke. While this self-destruction was more delayed than the usual 6 month to a year downfall timeframe for former Jay-Z affiliates, it still goes to show. For all we know, Biggs could’ve been dabbling in this shit at the onset of the Roc-A-Fella break-up and that could have contributed to Jay moving away because it’s so below the scale of what they were trying to do. On the other hand, this could just be the by-product of that very break-up and something that Biggs felt he had to resort back to doing to make up for the deficit caused by not generating industry revenue like he used to in the hey-days.

In either case, Jay must have had that same foresight when he quietly left Trouble-making rapper Tru-Life behind and pulled the plug on the experimental Roc La Familia imprint. 

Tru life and his real-life brother have found themselves charged with murder for what police are deeming as a retaliatory crime over an ongoing street beef. Taking plea agreements, Tru now faces a 10 year bid and his brother a 12 year stint for his role in the act. I guess that beats the inevitable 25 to Life that they would otherwise be serving, but damn niggas…There’s never really been a question about Tru Life’s involvement and connection to the streets. Dipset tried to make light of it during the heat of their rap spat that was more of a deflection of the real tension with Jay, but their taunting never hit any nerves. This is a guy who first started making waves by appearing on street DVD’s bragging about his crew bustin’ off shots and how they ran up in Mobb Deep‘s recording studio with guns ready to rob the group for backtracking on a verse. Once again, I wonder, is this the result of Jay dropping the kid and leaving him an unsigned, hungry, disgruntled rapper who only saw going back to the streets as an option?? Or is this the shit that the kid was on out of knuckle-headed impatience that made Jay dip in the first place?? Whatever the case is (and apparently, Murder was the case that they gave him), this is when keeping it real doesn’t pay. No one can give you years back off your life. And that’s Tru.

It gets better, order another round

This bastard here just admitted to killing his mother back in November after Thanksgiving in Philadelphia. How did he kill her? With a claw hammer. Why did he kill her? Because they had a 90 minute argument that ended with the 37 year old single mom taking his PlayStation system away. Not only did the 16 year old son strike his mother 20 times in her sleep with the Hammer, this was something that he spent 3 hours thinking about after the argument took place. I don’t even want to say anymore. Read the full story here. http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/2011/02/17/2011-02-17_teen_kills_mom_with_claw_hammer_for_taking_away_his_playstation_court.html

One thing about Negroes (and yes that includes hispanics and other brown minorities) is that they never cease to amaze, shock and awe you. Whether good or bad.

Black History Moment – Did Blacks really invent the RollerCoaster? And Granville T. Woods…Do you know this man??

While getting my hair cut earlier this week, I couldn’t help but notice a radio ad that played for Black History Month and listed an African-American as the inventor of the rollercoaster.

I’ve heard this loosely before, and I know that within the last few decades, Black folk have made a habit out of claiming people and accomplishments in an effort to empower ourselves even at the expense of being historically inaccurate.

I wanted to find out just how true this really was. What I found on a brief search through the internet was not one mention of anyone Black in the timeline of rollercoaster ingenuity, but in fact, a discrepancy that would lead to the confusing information. The discrepancy comes from the claim of two Black inventors by the name of Stephen E. Jackman and Byron B. Floyd who developed a ride at a Massachusetts rink in the late 1800’s that set toboggan-style sleds on a track with multiple hills. They claimed to be the very first to use the name and term “rollercoaster”. This has never been documented in history as fact and therefore leads to gray area. But it lends itself to my initial scrutiny being that a loosely stated declaration such as the one of the radio ad that purported to credit Blacks with the invention of the rollercoaster can be taken all the way wrong. Even if the 2 men were indeed the very first to use the term, they are not the inventors of the coaster at all. The original patent for what we’ve come to know as the rollercoaster was granted to a white man named LaMarcus Adna Thompson years earlier, and the prototypical basis of the design comes from Russian constructs from almost a century earlier.

Even more interesting than that, were my findings on yet another Black Man whose name had popped up within the footnotes of my Black History studies, but never fully given his proper light. Granville T. Woods, who has helped in the sophistication of rollercoaster track engineering (particularly at Coney island), is the foremost and singlehandedly most influential Black mechanical inventor of the industrial revolution.

Known casually throughout text as the “Black Edison”, Woods was primarily a self-taught electrician and mechanist. He attended college to sharpen his skills and moved around the world as an engineer until finally settling back in his home state of Ohio and developing patents. Though born a free-man in Pre Civil War America, can you imagine how ridiculously hard it had to have been to be a Black Inventor at the turn of the 19th Century????

As his race played the most important factor in his lack of notoriety and upward mobility, many of his patents were forced to be sold to larger corporations such as the American Bell Telephone Company. In addition to that, he faced a number of legal woes as his White Contemporaries at the time, such as Thomas Edison, made claims to his patents. Ironically, he won against those claims, but ultimately lost when he was the one doing the accusing and served jail time for Criminal Libel.

Like many geniuses in their time, he died broke and under-acknowledged for his contributions to the field of Mechanical engineering and electrical systems. However, not many inventors have resumes that boast such a versatile range.

His patents were usually improvements to existing inventions that have managed to stand the test of time. They include those to an advanced telephone transmitter and the telegraphony, which combined voice and signal messages. This also included patents to an incubator for farms, street car wheel that gave birth to the name “trolley”, and his most famous invention, the Synchronous Multiplex Railway Telegraph – which revolutionized electronic railway communication and travel.

Google this man today and learn something new that’s very old…

This has been my Black History Moment

 

16’s Candles Presents; The Have-Knotz “Blue Valentine – The Aaliyah Mixtape”

Click the pic to download. Do you Feel the Love???